Objectors Report 

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Webinar: Conscientious objection in Turkey and in exile

Wed., 7th July, 16:00 pm BST, 17:00 pm CEST, 18:00 pm Turkey

We are happy to invite you to a webinar in which conscientious objectors living in Turkey or in exile are given the floor to report about their experiences in the face of multiple repressions in their own country and an uncertain future abroad.

The event will last for 1 hour and 30 minutes and will be held in English and in Turkish with simultaneous translation.

This event is free. Please use the link here to register: https://us02web.zoom.us/meeting/register/tZUoce6ppz4uH9b5KiUk1ypfhABrrmBn9lSf

The webinar is organized by War Resisters’ International, Connection e.V. and Union Pacifiste de France

Hillel Rabin. Foto: Oren Ziv, www.972mag.com

Israel: Conscientious objector Hallel Rabin about her time in prison

(27.11.2020) Hillel Rabin spent 56 days in military prison for refusing to serve in the IDF. Now she opens up about her time behind bars, conversations with her fellow inmates, and talking to young Israelis about the occupation.

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Hallel Rabin

Israel: "I chose not to enlist in the army"

Video-Statement of Hallel Rabin

(22.10.2020) Hallel Rabin, a conscientious objector, spent two terms in Prison 6 for refusing to serve in the army. A few days before returning to the ICRC to refuse for a third time, she was interviewed by Social TV and justified her decision to refuse in public, after the IDF Conscience Committee was not persuaded to dismiss her

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Yasmin Ricci-Yahav

Israel: A Conscientious Objector’s Thoughts From a Military Prison

(03.11.2019) In military jail, before the girls know your name, they want to know why you’re there. It’s the first question asked of any girl who joins the complex, and her answer, and more importantly, the way she answers, allows the others to understand something about her. Is she angry or afraid? Does her imprisonment seem justified? Is this her first time in jail, or does she know the way things are run here? Is she staying for a while, is it worth getting to know her? When a girl enters a cell at night, the others sit on their beds and watch her carefully, closely, and try to understand what sort of person is going to share their cell and their lives for the next few days or weeks. But after the customary questions are answered and the girl explains why and how long she is there for, the conversation quickly softens and returns to normal.

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